Contributors

DU JARDIN Philippe, PhD

Professor

Data Mining, Neural Networks, Machine Learning

FOULQUIER Philippe, PHD

Director of the EDHEC Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre - Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track - Director of Executive MBA & Professor

Financial Analysis, Insurance, Risk Management, Performance Measure, Family Business, Corporate Finance

EDHEC - Forbes india

 

object(FacebookApiException)#2353 (8) { ["result":protected]=> array(1) { ["error"]=> array(5) { ["message"]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["type"]=> string(14) "OAuthException" ["is_transient"]=> bool(true) ["code"]=> int(4) ["fbtrace_id"]=> string(11) "HWo6S8VTlLp" } } ["message":protected]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["string":"Exception":private]=> string(0) "" ["code":protected]=> int(0) ["file":protected]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line":protected]=> int(1325) ["trace":"Exception":private]=> array(15) { [0]=> array(6) { ["file"]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line"]=> int(896) ["function"]=> string(17) "throwAPIException" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(1) { ["error"]=> array(5) { ["message"]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["type"]=> string(14) "OAuthException" ["is_transient"]=> bool(true) ["code"]=> int(4) ["fbtrace_id"]=> string(11) "HWo6S8VTlLp" } } } } [1]=> array(4) { ["function"]=> string(6) "_graph" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } [2]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line"]=> int(672) ["function"]=> string(20) "call_user_func_array" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &array(2) { [0]=> object(Facebook)#2348 (10) { ["sharedSessionID":protected]=> NULL ["appId":protected]=> string(15) "934140480029912" ["appSecret":protected]=> string(32) "2137b92265281fe099902a43a14609d0" ["user":protected]=> NULL ["signedRequest":protected]=> NULL ["state":protected]=> NULL ["accessToken":protected]=> string(48) "934140480029912|2137b92265281fe099902a43a14609d0" ["fileUploadSupport":protected]=> bool(false) ["trustForwarded":protected]=> bool(false) ["allowSignedRequest":protected]=> bool(true) } [1]=> string(6) "_graph" } [1]=> &array(1) { [0]=> string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } } [3]=> array(6) { ["file"]=> string(109) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/social.module" ["line"]=> int(187) ["function"]=> string(3) "api" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } [4]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(109) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/social.module" ["line"]=> int(16) ["function"]=> string(18) "social_getFacebook" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [5]=> array(2) { ["function"]=> string(11) "social_cron" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [6]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/module.inc" ["line"]=> int(926) ["function"]=> string(20) "call_user_func_array" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &string(11) "social_cron" [1]=> &array(0) { } } } [7]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(5423) ["function"]=> string(13) "module_invoke" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &string(6) "social" [1]=> &string(4) "cron" } } [8]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(68) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/modules/system/system.module" ["line"]=> int(3560) ["function"]=> string(15) "drupal_cron_run" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [9]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2784) ["function"]=> string(25) "system_run_automated_cron" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [10]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2756) ["function"]=> string(18) "drupal_page_footer" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [11]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(76) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/all/modules/boost/boost.module" ["line"]=> int(1450) ["function"]=> string(24) "drupal_deliver_html_page" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(3) { ["term_heading"]=> array(3) { ["#prefix"]=> string(34) "
" ["#suffix"]=> string(6) "
" ["term"]=> array(8) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#bundle"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["#view_mode"]=> string(4) "full" ["#theme"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#term"]=> object(stdClass)#262 (15) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" ["vid"]=> string(2) "24" ["name"]=> string(31) "Financial Analysis & Accounting" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "df1a4f04-9f5b-4112-8c4f-41687ffeac34" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["i18n_tsid"]=> string(1) "0" ["vocabulary_machine_name"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["field_media_sujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49787" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(29) "banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(38) "public://banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "162925" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525425366" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "d8b1d3f6-f7bd-49a4-a691-92bd408b4cca" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } ["alt"]=> NULL ["title"]=> NULL ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { ["title"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(54) "EDHECVox [term:name] | [current-page:pager][site:name]" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(5) { ["rdftype"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:Concept" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(10) "rdfs:label" [1]=> string(14) "skos:prefLabel" } } ["description"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "skos:definition" } } ["vid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "skos:inScheme" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["parent"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:broader" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "0" } ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#attached"]=> array(1) { ["css"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.css" } } } } ["nodes"]=> array(5) { [64097]=> array(11) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(124) "Read more about Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64097" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (35) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "1" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "2fac03b2-fb79-4fe6-b698-9b124aaddb95" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["type"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "e8093f6a-0acf-4eb9-b6e8-f21cefdb46b2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["revision_uid"]=> string(1) "1" ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" ["format"]=> NULL ["safe_value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" } } } ["field_image2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49500" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_1.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "bd12e3a7-c342-407f-9b8c-8cbacba25cf7" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_revue_de_presse"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "62240" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(9) { ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(28) "stephanie.malherbe@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64097" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(0) } [62536]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(156) "Read more about Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62536" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(7) "English" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62536" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(1) } [62519]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(143) "Read more about Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62519" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62519" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(2) } [52255]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(257) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(97) "Read more about Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/52255" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "52255" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(3) } ["#sorted"]=> bool(true) } ["pager"]=> array(2) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "pager" ["#weight"]=> int(5) } } } } [12]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2625) ["function"]=> string(23) "boost_deliver_html_page" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(3) { ["term_heading"]=> array(3) { ["#prefix"]=> string(34) "
" ["#suffix"]=> string(6) "
" ["term"]=> array(8) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#bundle"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["#view_mode"]=> string(4) "full" ["#theme"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#term"]=> object(stdClass)#262 (15) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" ["vid"]=> string(2) "24" ["name"]=> string(31) "Financial Analysis & Accounting" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "df1a4f04-9f5b-4112-8c4f-41687ffeac34" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["i18n_tsid"]=> string(1) "0" ["vocabulary_machine_name"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["field_media_sujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49787" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(29) "banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(38) "public://banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "162925" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525425366" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "d8b1d3f6-f7bd-49a4-a691-92bd408b4cca" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } ["alt"]=> NULL ["title"]=> NULL ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { ["title"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(54) "EDHECVox [term:name] | [current-page:pager][site:name]" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(5) { ["rdftype"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:Concept" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(10) "rdfs:label" [1]=> string(14) "skos:prefLabel" } } ["description"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "skos:definition" } } ["vid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "skos:inScheme" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["parent"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:broader" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "0" } ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#attached"]=> array(1) { ["css"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.css" } } } } ["nodes"]=> array(5) { [64097]=> array(11) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(124) "Read more about Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64097" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (35) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "1" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "2fac03b2-fb79-4fe6-b698-9b124aaddb95" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["type"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "e8093f6a-0acf-4eb9-b6e8-f21cefdb46b2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["revision_uid"]=> string(1) "1" ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" ["format"]=> NULL ["safe_value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" } } } ["field_image2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49500" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_1.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "bd12e3a7-c342-407f-9b8c-8cbacba25cf7" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_revue_de_presse"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "62240" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(9) { ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(28) "stephanie.malherbe@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64097" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(0) } [62536]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(156) "Read more about Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62536" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(7) "English" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62536" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(1) } [62519]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(143) "Read more about Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62519" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62519" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(2) } [52255]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(257) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(97) "Read more about Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/52255" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "52255" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(3) } ["#sorted"]=> bool(true) } ["pager"]=> array(2) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "pager" ["#weight"]=> int(5) } } } } [13]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(57) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/menu.inc" ["line"]=> int(542) ["function"]=> string(19) "drupal_deliver_page" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &array(3) { ["term_heading"]=> array(3) { ["#prefix"]=> string(34) "
" ["#suffix"]=> string(6) "
" ["term"]=> array(8) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#bundle"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["#view_mode"]=> string(4) "full" ["#theme"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#term"]=> object(stdClass)#262 (15) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" ["vid"]=> string(2) "24" ["name"]=> string(31) "Financial Analysis & Accounting" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "df1a4f04-9f5b-4112-8c4f-41687ffeac34" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["i18n_tsid"]=> string(1) "0" ["vocabulary_machine_name"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["field_media_sujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49787" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(29) "banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(38) "public://banner_financial_analysis.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "162925" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525425366" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "d8b1d3f6-f7bd-49a4-a691-92bd408b4cca" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } ["alt"]=> NULL ["title"]=> NULL ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { ["title"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(54) "EDHECVox [term:name] | [current-page:pager][site:name]" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(5) { ["rdftype"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:Concept" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(10) "rdfs:label" [1]=> string(14) "skos:prefLabel" } } ["description"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "skos:definition" } } ["vid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "skos:inScheme" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["parent"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:broader" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "0" } ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#attached"]=> array(1) { ["css"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.css" } } } } ["nodes"]=> array(5) { [64097]=> array(11) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(124) "Read more about Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64097" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (35) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["title"]=> string(64) "Solvabilité II freine le retour des assureurs dans l'immobilier" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "1" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "2fac03b2-fb79-4fe6-b698-9b124aaddb95" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64097" ["type"]=> string(16) "vox_media_impact" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "e8093f6a-0acf-4eb9-b6e8-f21cefdb46b2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525359876" ["revision_uid"]=> string(1) "1" ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" ["format"]=> NULL ["safe_value"]=> string(9) "Les Echos" } } } ["field_image2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49500" ["uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_1.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525266993" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "bd12e3a7-c342-407f-9b8c-8cbacba25cf7" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_revue_de_presse"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "62240" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(9) { ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(28) "stephanie.malherbe@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64097" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(0) } [62536]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(156) "Read more about Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62536" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(7) "English" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#215 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(86) "Interview with Philippe Foulquier: our research fosters EDHEC's "Make an impact" motto" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3bfe439e-6194-4d0a-bf9c-842e56382708" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62536" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "en" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509985912" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ad0ff764-ae6f-48c1-9f15-4020c33d55b5" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525430336" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1530) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["summary"]=> string(469) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1523) "

In a recent interview included in the latest issue of the Research Highlights (the EDHEC quarterly research and expertises newsletter), Philippe FoulquierProfessor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explique how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed by the exchanges with businesses and students. 

 Our research has also helped develop the asset-liability management of many insurance companies and asset management companies. For over 10 years now, we have been regularly sought out by the European Commission, EIOPA, professional associations and numerous European companies.

Read the full article

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(468) "

In a recent interview included in the EDHEC Research Highlights newsletter, Philippe Foulquier, Professor, Director of the Financial Analysis and Accounting (FAA) Research Centre, Director of the Executive MBA Paris and Academic Director of MSc Financial Management in European Apprenticeship Track at EDHEC Business School, explains how the research works of the FAA centre research benefit from and feed the exchanges with businesses and students. 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "275" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47426" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(39) "public://philippe_foulquier_light_0.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869045" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa8f3adf-22df-4593-bdc4-1736013c4b1b" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(610) "Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(618) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professor and Director of Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre, EDHEC Business School
This article is taken from the latest issue (October 2017) of the EDHEC Research Highlights, the quarterly EDHEC research and expertise newsletter. Register here

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "266" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62536" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(1) } [62519]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(143) "Read more about Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62519" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(88) "Philippe Foulquier : « Notre recherche cultive la devise de l’EDHEC Make an impact »" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "ad82ee74-237b-4383-a917-fdead64d99c1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509099596" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["tnid"]=> string(5) "62519" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6b33f351-11b6-4535-84e8-e3a7b62f47b7" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683560" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1785) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(522) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1778) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights (la newsletter trimestrielle de la recherche et des expertises EDHEC), le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produite par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

 Suite à nos travaux de recherche, conférences et formations en entreprises, certaines sociétés ont fait évoluer leur référentiel pour mesurer et piloter la performance de leur société (évolution d’une mesure à une unique dimension « marges » vers un mesure à trois dimensions « marges, rentabilité des capitaux, risque »), et ce, tout secteur confondu.

Lire l'article dans son intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(521) "

Dans un entretien accordé par Philippe Foulquier pour le dernier numéro de la Research Highlights, le professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité (FAA), de l’Executive MBA Paris et Directeur académique du MSc Financial Management Filière européenne d’apprentissage à l’EDHEC Business School, explique en quoi les travaux de recherche produits par le pôle FAA bénéficie et se nourrit de ces relations avec les entreprises les étudiants.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47425" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(28) "philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["uri"]=> string(37) "public://philippe_foulquier_light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "478921" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523868942" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "54b9f6a3-ff98-4635-9591-9ee0fd4aa66e" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(653) "Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(661) "

Philippe Foulquier, Professeur et Directeur du Pôle de recherche en Analyse Financière et Comptabilité, EDHEC Business School
Cet article est extrait du dernier numéro (Octobre 2017) de l'EDHEC Research Highlights, la newsletter de la recherche et des expertises de l'EDHEC. Pour recevoir cette newsletter, cliquez ici

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63540" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5760" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(80) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/notre-recherche-cultive-la-devise-de-ledhec-make-impact" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62519" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(2) } [52255]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(257) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(97) "Read more about Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/52255" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(42) "Newton et les modèles de scoring bancaire" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3393e763-1f7b-4c83-a047-0b0e7ea75d84" ["nid"]=> string(5) "52255" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1505479921" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b692c215-32a6-4f79-9d7c-5508d677acbe" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683649" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(9859) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(9825) "

Datant des années 60, les premiers modèles de scoring bancaires ont connu, au fil du temps, plusieurs vagues d’amélioration dues notamment aux progrès de l’algorithmique et des techniques d’apprentissage. Or, malgré des avancées notables dans ces domaines, les institutions financières baignent toujours dans le monde statistique d’il y a 50 ans. Comme si aujourd’hui l’industrie spatiale continuait à paramétrer ses satellites en employant les équations de Newton alors qu’elles ont été remplacées depuis bien longtemps par celles d’Einstein. Retour sur un demi-siècle parfois encore obscur pour certains.

Les modèles de scoring sont employés par les banques et les institutions financières pour estimer le risque de défaut de paiement de leurs débiteurs et ce, aussi bien pour des raisons commerciales que prudentielles. Commerciales, car ils permettent de déterminer si un prêt peut être attribué à un client en fonction de sa probabilité de non remboursement, et définir quel sera le taux à appliquer à ce même client selon le niveau de risque qu’il présente. Prudentielles, car les estimations de risque sont utilisées pour définir le montant des provisions servant à couvrir les pertes potentielles que pourraient subir les établissements financiers.

La faillite représentant l’élément déclencheur principal d’un défaut de paiement, et conduisant aux pertes les plus substantielles pour le créancier, ces modèles sont rapidement devenus des modèles de faillite ; prévoir un défaut revenait alors à prévoir l’occurrence de l’événement le plus dramatique pouvant le causer.

À l’origine, un modèle s’exprimait sous la forme d’une équation simple où le risque était calculé grâce à une combinaison linéaire d’un certain nombre de ratios financiers choisis selon leur capacité à discriminer correctement les firmes susceptibles de disparaître et les autres. D’une certaine manière, une équation permettait de calculer une distance entre la situation financière d’une entreprise donnée, estimée à un moment donné de son existence, et un état prototypique de faillite. La probabilité de faillite était alors proportionnelle à l’étendue de l’écart entre les deux. Cette façon d’appréhender le risque est toujours en vigueur dans les institutions financières. La Banque de France d’ailleurs a largement documenté sa méthode fondée sur l’analyse discriminante dès les années 80 et n’en a pas changé depuis.

Les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation

La simplicité d’élaboration des premiers modèles de scoring, comme d’ailleurs leur assez bonne efficacité, ont conduit assez rapidement à la généralisation de leur emploi. Mais ce qui a fait leur succès est aussi à l’origine de leurs principales limites.

Tout d’abord, les modèles de scoring supposent que la relation entre les variables explicatives, donc les ratios financiers décrivant l’état d’un débiteur, et le risque, est linéaire, et que ces mêmes variables peuvent se compenser totalement, puisque le modèle est additif. Or, les effets de seuil que l’on peut constater lorsque l’on observe la distribution des ratios montrent que la compensation ne fonctionne que sur une partie, parfois réduite, de celle-ci ; et ces mêmes effets de seuil font que de la probabilité de défaut suit souvent une fonction dont la pente change de sens au voisinage de la valeur d’un seuil. C’est précisément pour ces raisons que des méthodes comme les réseaux de neurones ou les machines à vecteur support, qui permettent de créer des modèles non linéaires, conduisent le plus souvent à de bien meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus avec les méthodes du monde bancaire. Les modèles linéaires apparaissent en définitive comme étant trop simples pour appréhender correctement toute la complexité du phénomène de faillite.

Ensuite, ces modèles reposent sur des règles de classification uniques, un modèle s’exprimant sous la forme d’une seule et même équation. L’état de faillite est alors réductible à un seul état critique de référence et le modèle incarne en quelque sorte la frontière entre celui-ci et un état de survie potentielle. L’unicité de la règle de prévision suppose donc que les symptômes de la faillite sont les mêmes pour toutes les firmes et que les ratios employés pour appréhender ces symptômes se dégradent à peu près tous de la même manière, selon le même rythme et avec la même magnitude. Or, il est n’est pas rare de constater que certaines firmes, qui apparaissent en bonne santé du point de vue d’un modèle, finissent par faire faillite de manière inattendue alors que d’autres, qui présentent des signes de très mauvaise santé, arrivent néanmoins à survivre et parfois très longtemps. On sait que la faillite est le résultat de processus divers, qui peuvent être longs à se mettre en place, et qui peuvent donner naissance à différents états ou différentes formes de déclin. Dès lors, on comprend que s’il existe une variété de situations prototypiques que les firmes peuvent rencontrer avant de mourir, aucun modèle construit autour d’une seule règle de classement n’est à même d’appréhender une telle pluralité de formes. C’est là que les techniques dites « ensemblistes » viennent corriger les insuffisances des modèles traditionnels. Elles permettent en effet d’appréhender la variété des situations de faillite en employant non pas un seul modèle, mais un ensemble de modèles. Les techniques employées à cette fin ont pour objet de créer un méta-modèle dont chaque élément dispose d'une expertise particulière propre à une certaine région de l'espace de décision. Un ensemble est alors constitué de plusieurs dizaines ou centaines de modèles, conçus indépendamment ou non les uns des autres, et sa prévision est calculée en combinant les prévisions individuelles de chaque modèle, le plus souvent à l’aide d’un vote majoritaire. Si les constituants d’un ensemble sont suffisamment bien choisis et suffisamment divers, ils permettent alors de capter plus d'informations sur la frontière de séparation des classes que ne peuvent le faire les modèles uniques et conduisent en général à de meilleurs résultats que ceux obtenus par ces derniers.

Enfin, les modèles de scoring s’appuient sur une vision le plus souvent statique des signes avant-coureurs de la faillite, ceux-ci étant simplement appréhendés au travers de quelques mesures instantanées de la situation financière des firmes. En effet, les variables des modèles sont généralement estimées une seule fois et un an avant l’horizon des prévisions. Or, la faillite résulte d’une dynamique qui s’inscrit d’abord dans l’histoire des entreprises et ne peut donc être décrite correctement par des modèles qui n’intègrent pas une dimension temporelle. C’est vraisemblablement là que réside la plus grande faiblesse des modèles bancaires. Non seulement ils considèrent la faillite comme le résultat du franchissement d’un seuil commun à toutes les firmes, mais en plus ils voient le processus qui y conduit comme étant a historique, comme si l’exposition d’une firme à un risque au cours d’une période de son histoire ne modifiait en rien son espérance de vie. Là encore, certains modèles qui permettent d’appréhender l’évolution de la situation financière des entreprises au cours du temps conduisent à de meilleures prévisions que ceux obtenus par les modèles bancaires.

Les trois types de modélisation qui viennent d’être présentés (modèles non-linéaires, modèles ensemblistes, modèles historiques) ne sont pas mutuellement exclusifs, et peuvent se combiner. Ainsi, les techniques les plus récentes et les plus avancées reposent-elles sur une modélisation particulière du passé des entreprises, au travers de « trajectoires » incarnant l’évolution dans le temps de la santé des entreprises ou au travers de « patterns » incarnant des formes prototypiques de faillite, alliée à l’emploi de techniques ensemblistes combinées avec des réseaux de neurones.

Tout ceci montre bien l’étendue de l’écart existant entre les pratiques des établissements financiers et la réalité des techniques modernes d’estimation du risque de défaut. En définitive, les modèles employés par le monde bancaire sont à la prévision de faillite ce que les équations de Newton sont à la gravitation. Les équations de Newton représentent une vision du monde simple et bien adaptée à l’époque où elles ont été conçues et à son stade de développement des connaissances en physique : elles ne sont pas fausses, mais elles ne correspondent qu’à un cas particulier du cas général décrit par les équations d’Einstein. Pour autant, si on les employait pour synchroniser les horloges des satellites du système GPS avec celles présentes sur terre, aucune géolocalisation ne serait possible car trop entachée d’erreur.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "230" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "267" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "19" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47123" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://newtons-modeles_scoring_bancaire.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "13708" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523628751" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fa956cf8-fe50-42e9-b5fc-56789366ec7f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(322) "Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(362) "

Philippe du Jardin
Professeur de Systèmes d'Informations, membre du Pôle de recherche en Analyse financière et comptabilité à l'EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "261" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "324" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63330" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5743" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "52255" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(3) } ["#sorted"]=> bool(true) } ["pager"]=> array(2) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "pager" ["#weight"]=> int(5) } } [1]=> &string(0) "" } } [14]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(49) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/index.php" ["line"]=> int(21) ["function"]=> string(27) "menu_execute_active_handler" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } } ["previous":"Exception":private]=> NULL } array(1) { ["error"]=> array(5) { ["message"]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["type"]=> string(14) "OAuthException" ["is_transient"]=> bool(true) ["code"]=> int(4) ["fbtrace_id"]=> string(11) "HWo6S8VTlLp" } }