EDHEC - Forbes india

 

object(FacebookApiException)#2357 (8) { ["result":protected]=> array(1) { ["error"]=> array(5) { ["message"]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["type"]=> string(14) "OAuthException" ["is_transient"]=> bool(true) ["code"]=> int(4) ["fbtrace_id"]=> string(11) "HQSu6FxYnVp" } } ["message":protected]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["string":"Exception":private]=> string(0) "" ["code":protected]=> int(0) ["file":protected]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line":protected]=> int(1325) ["trace":"Exception":private]=> array(15) { [0]=> array(6) { ["file"]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line"]=> int(896) ["function"]=> string(17) "throwAPIException" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(1) { ["error"]=> array(5) { ["message"]=> string(38) "(#4) Application request limit reached" ["type"]=> string(14) "OAuthException" ["is_transient"]=> bool(true) ["code"]=> int(4) ["fbtrace_id"]=> string(11) "HQSu6FxYnVp" } } } } [1]=> array(4) { ["function"]=> string(6) "_graph" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } [2]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(131) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/includes/facebook/base_facebook.php" ["line"]=> int(672) ["function"]=> string(20) "call_user_func_array" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &array(2) { [0]=> object(Facebook)#2352 (10) { ["sharedSessionID":protected]=> NULL ["appId":protected]=> string(15) "934140480029912" ["appSecret":protected]=> string(32) "2137b92265281fe099902a43a14609d0" ["user":protected]=> NULL ["signedRequest":protected]=> NULL ["state":protected]=> NULL ["accessToken":protected]=> string(48) "934140480029912|2137b92265281fe099902a43a14609d0" ["fileUploadSupport":protected]=> bool(false) ["trustForwarded":protected]=> bool(false) ["allowSignedRequest":protected]=> bool(true) } [1]=> string(6) "_graph" } [1]=> &array(1) { [0]=> string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } } [3]=> array(6) { ["file"]=> string(109) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/social.module" ["line"]=> int(187) ["function"]=> string(3) "api" ["class"]=> string(12) "BaseFacebook" ["type"]=> string(2) "->" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &string(18) "/153577078551/feed" } } [4]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(109) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/www.edhec-portail.pprod.net/modules/custom/social/social.module" ["line"]=> int(16) ["function"]=> string(18) "social_getFacebook" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [5]=> array(2) { ["function"]=> string(11) "social_cron" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [6]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/module.inc" ["line"]=> int(926) ["function"]=> string(20) "call_user_func_array" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &string(11) "social_cron" [1]=> &array(0) { } } } [7]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(5423) ["function"]=> string(13) "module_invoke" ["args"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &string(6) "social" [1]=> &string(4) "cron" } } [8]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(68) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/modules/system/system.module" ["line"]=> int(3560) ["function"]=> string(15) "drupal_cron_run" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [9]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2784) ["function"]=> string(25) "system_run_automated_cron" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [10]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2756) ["function"]=> string(18) "drupal_page_footer" ["args"]=> array(0) { } } [11]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(76) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/sites/all/modules/boost/boost.module" ["line"]=> int(1450) ["function"]=> string(24) "drupal_deliver_html_page" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(3) { ["term_heading"]=> array(3) { ["#prefix"]=> string(34) "
" ["#suffix"]=> string(6) "
" ["term"]=> array(8) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#bundle"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["#view_mode"]=> string(4) "full" ["#theme"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#term"]=> object(stdClass)#262 (15) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" ["vid"]=> string(2) "24" ["name"]=> string(23) "Leadership & Management" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0b0b0086-950a-40ac-9729-e69afeb3b2ab" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["i18n_tsid"]=> string(1) "0" ["vocabulary_machine_name"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["field_media_sujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49799" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "banner_self-leadership.gif" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://banner_self-leadership.gif" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/gif" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "523671" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525426192" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "306fcb91-509a-441b-bd0c-a6c75a6c1687" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } ["alt"]=> NULL ["title"]=> NULL ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { ["title"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(54) "EDHECVox [term:name] | [current-page:pager][site:name]" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(5) { ["rdftype"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:Concept" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(10) "rdfs:label" [1]=> string(14) "skos:prefLabel" } } ["description"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "skos:definition" } } ["vid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "skos:inScheme" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["parent"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:broader" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "0" } ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#attached"]=> array(1) { ["css"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.css" } } } } ["nodes"]=> array(11) { [64359]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(297) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(95) "Read more about Another change? How to let go of the old" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64359" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64359" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(0) } [64067]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(498) "Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(510) "

Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "19964" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(13) "The Economist" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(21) "

The Economist

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(498) "Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(510) "

Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "19964" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(13) "The Economist" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(21) "

The Economist

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(85) "Read more about Coaching to improve motivation" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64067" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(498) "Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(510) "

Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "19964" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(13) "The Economist" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(21) "

The Economist

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64067" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(1) } [64444]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#237 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) ""Arbitrer c’est exercer du leadership"" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "93c4cf19-e90e-4166-b4a3-7692d6a6e260" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9b52d801-6090-459c-aed7-2eef1db53a5a" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1532) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1525) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "4652078" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(24) "arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(33) "public://arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "22322" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b64ceeb2-3121-45ea-b6eb-c6128536b59a" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(6) "FORBES" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(14) "

FORBES

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1532) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1525) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(312) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Manageme

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#237 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) ""Arbitrer c’est exercer du leadership"" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "93c4cf19-e90e-4166-b4a3-7692d6a6e260" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9b52d801-6090-459c-aed7-2eef1db53a5a" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1532) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1525) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "4652078" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(24) "arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(33) "public://arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "22322" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b64ceeb2-3121-45ea-b6eb-c6128536b59a" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(6) "FORBES" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(14) "

FORBES

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "4652078" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(24) "arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(33) "public://arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "22322" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b64ceeb2-3121-45ea-b6eb-c6128536b59a" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "4652078" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(24) "arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(33) "public://arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "22322" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b64ceeb2-3121-45ea-b6eb-c6128536b59a" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(105) "Read more about "Arbitrer c’est exercer du leadership"" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64444" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(40) ""Arbitrer c’est exercer du leadership"" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#237 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) ""Arbitrer c’est exercer du leadership"" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "93c4cf19-e90e-4166-b4a3-7692d6a6e260" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64444" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9b52d801-6090-459c-aed7-2eef1db53a5a" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528900071" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1532) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1525) "

Dans une tribune publiée par Forbes, Sylvie Deffayet, professeur de Management et Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l’EDHEC Business School, décrypte la posture de l’arbitre de football et en tire des enseignements utiles en matière d’exercice de l’autorité en entreprise. Une position “basse”, qui “s’efface”, “un match refait”, “un corps qui parle”... Et si ces managers de stade avaient des choses à apprendre aux managers de bureau ?

Lire l'article en intégralité

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "4652078" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(24) "arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(33) "public://arbitre_leadership_1.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "22322" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528800807" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b64ceeb2-3121-45ea-b6eb-c6128536b59a" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "419" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(6) "FORBES" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(14) "

FORBES

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64444" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(2) } [63935]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#255 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(84) "Développer son leadership, c’est faire du ménage dans ses croyances inhibitrices" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "f690dc3e-f24f-40d6-98b0-2c42790fc31b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "4aa507f5-f1a4-4994-b182-2cb02a4ef24b" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(637) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(164) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(631) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(163) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47473" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "unlock-potential-light.png" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://unlock-potential-light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "122648" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "40805649-0183-4cb6-ac74-75514554a403" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(286) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(331) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "342" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(637) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(164) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(631) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(163) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(163) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#255 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(84) "Développer son leadership, c’est faire du ménage dans ses croyances inhibitrices" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "f690dc3e-f24f-40d6-98b0-2c42790fc31b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "4aa507f5-f1a4-4994-b182-2cb02a4ef24b" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(637) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(164) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(631) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(163) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47473" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "unlock-potential-light.png" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://unlock-potential-light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "122648" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "40805649-0183-4cb6-ac74-75514554a403" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(286) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(331) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "342" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47473" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "unlock-potential-light.png" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://unlock-potential-light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "122648" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "40805649-0183-4cb6-ac74-75514554a403" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47473" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "unlock-potential-light.png" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://unlock-potential-light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "122648" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "40805649-0183-4cb6-ac74-75514554a403" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(139) "Read more about Développer son leadership, c’est faire du ménage dans ses croyances inhibitrices" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/63935" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(84) "Développer son leadership, c’est faire du ménage dans ses croyances inhibitrices" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#255 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(84) "Développer son leadership, c’est faire du ménage dans ses croyances inhibitrices" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "f690dc3e-f24f-40d6-98b0-2c42790fc31b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63935" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "4aa507f5-f1a4-4994-b182-2cb02a4ef24b" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(637) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(164) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(631) "

Qu’est-ce que je crois sur moi ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur l’autre ou les autres ? Qu’est-ce que je crois sur la relation ? Comment je crois que cela va se passer ? Ces questions consistant à identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(163) "

Identifier ses croyances est nécessaire pour se sentir légitime, à la bonne place et développer son leadership. Un enjeu majeur pour les managers.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47473" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "unlock-potential-light.png" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://unlock-potential-light.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "122648" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523881999" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "40805649-0183-4cb6-ac74-75514554a403" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(286) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(331) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "342" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "63935" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(3) } [63558]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#245 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(51) "Self-Leadership et Followership : quels rapports ? " ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3513b9b9-8af2-4ad7-a36a-6fac6bfc4eb1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1519909757" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ef04354b-d3e3-4756-9420-73fef37ac984" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6609) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["summary"]=> string(501) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6578) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(500) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(33) "followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(42) "public://followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "14550" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523875136" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0f044934-59df-4d6e-8699-d1f5e757246f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6609) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["summary"]=> string(501) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6578) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(500) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(500) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#245 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(51) "Self-Leadership et Followership : quels rapports ? " ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3513b9b9-8af2-4ad7-a36a-6fac6bfc4eb1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1519909757" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ef04354b-d3e3-4756-9420-73fef37ac984" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6609) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["summary"]=> string(501) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6578) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(500) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(33) "followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(42) "public://followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "14550" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523875136" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0f044934-59df-4d6e-8699-d1f5e757246f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(33) "followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(42) "public://followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "14550" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523875136" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0f044934-59df-4d6e-8699-d1f5e757246f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(33) "followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(42) "public://followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "14550" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523875136" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0f044934-59df-4d6e-8699-d1f5e757246f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(106) "Read more about Self-Leadership et Followership : quels rapports ? " ["href"]=> string(10) "node/63558" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(51) "Self-Leadership et Followership : quels rapports ? " } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#245 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(51) "Self-Leadership et Followership : quels rapports ? " ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "3513b9b9-8af2-4ad7-a36a-6fac6bfc4eb1" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63558" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1519909757" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "ef04354b-d3e3-4756-9420-73fef37ac984" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525683335" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6609) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["summary"]=> string(501) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6578) "

Parmi la masse de travaux académiques qui étudient le leadership sous toutes ses formes, il en existe une assez faible part qui s’intéresse au followership. Il est vrai que le terme est peu attractif. Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? Les chercheurs en followership étudient donc les théories implicites du leadership, ces croyances personnelles, propres à chaque collaborateur, qui impactent tout autant la relation managériale que le style de leadership adopté par le manager. Examinons l’une de ces paires de lunettes que sont nos modèles internes d’autorité pour éprouver la pertinence de cette approche.

Rapports « insecurises » à l’autorite

 Nous n’avons n’a pas attendu l’entreprise pour vivre des relations d’autorité. Nous abordons donc nos premiers supérieurs hiérarchiques (et les suivants) avec des a priori, le plus souvent inconscients, sur ce que cette relation peut nous apporter ou pas. Ces présupposés sont une synthèse réalisée à partir de nos premières relations d’autorité. L’autorité et tous ceux qui l’incarnent sont alors vécus, soit comme source de sécurité, de développement et d’autonomie, soit comme source d’insécurité. La psychologie clinique avec la théorie de l’attachement (Bowlby, 1969), ainsi qu’une typologie plus récente appliquée au management (Kahn et Kram, 1994) permettent d’identifier ces « modèles internes d’autorité » chez chacun : parmi les personnes qui ont une théorie personnelle dite insécurisée, on trouve deux variantes :

La croyance du collaborateur dépendant est que le titre et le statut ont une valeur très importante. C’est une personne qui met l’accent sur la hiérarchie et les différences de statut, idéalise l’autorité et ses représentants. Ce type de rapport à l’autorité conduit à prendre peu d’initiatives et à préférer se raccrocher aux règles et rôles hiérarchiques. Il s’agit d’un profil particulièrement « obéissant », un collaborateur qui a tendance à s’accrocher véritablement à la relation d’autorité, c’est-à-dire à son manager. Parce qu’il a besoin de beaucoup de proximité, il va vérifier régulièrement qu’il fait bien ce que l’on attend de lui, quitte à parfois lasser le manager quand ce besoin est trop important.

► A l’opposé, le collaborateur contredépendant a intégré la croyance qu’il ne peut avoir vraiment confiance dans l’aide des figures d’autorité. Pour lui l’autorité et ses représentants sont suspects et il faut s’en méfier ; il rejette fréquemment les différences de statut et dénie l’importance de la hiérarchie. Dans toute une vie professionnelle, il n’est pas rare qu’aucun n+1 ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. Les managers trouvent ce profil de collaborateur plus difficile à « encadrer » et pour cause.... L’important est de comprendre pour ces managers que leur qualités ou efforts de leader n’est pas en cause : c’est chez le follower que cela se passe.

Si ces deux premiers modèles sont une version « insécurisée » du rapport à l’autorité, ils sont parfaitement solubles dans l’entreprise. Simplement, le premier trouvera son bonheur dans des environnements où la hiérarchie et les règles sont présentes, alors que le second s’arrangera très bien de modalités en « freelance » de la relation d’encadrement (ce que permettent aisément les modes d’organisation par projet par exemple).

Developper la confiance

Pour le collaborateur interdépendant, l’autorité managériale est une nécessité mais il a intériorisé la croyance que l’autorité est un véritable processus d’échange. Il a expérimenté des relations d’autorité où les autres sont disponibles, apportant des réponses et de l’aide. Cela le rend confiant dans une forme d’exploration intrépide du monde. Ce collaborateur-là n’hésite jamais à confier ses doutes, peurs, avis différents avec toute personne incarnant la hiérarchie d’une entreprise car il est sûr d’être bien accueilli et écouté (sans pour autant présumer de ce qui sera fait de ses avis bien sûr).

Bien sûr, il n’existe pas de modèle « pur » mais simplement des modèles dominants ; ceux-ci peuvent évoluer au contact de relations hiérarchiques « significatives ». Nos recherches semblent indiquer que des réponses managériales inadéquates (ou « accidents d’autorité ») peuvent être utilisés par les collaborateurs « insécurisés » pour renforcer leur croyance dans leurs modèles internes, alors qu’au contraire un management qui active l’interdépendance tend à pousser ces modèles vers une version réellement développante pour l’autonomie du collaborateur.

« Dis-moi comment tu diriges, je te dirais comment tu obeis »

Pour le Self-Leadership, la manière dont nous accordons de la légitimité à l’autre nous renseigne également sur la manière d’exercer notre leadership ou notre autorité. Le manager dépendant est souvent très soucieux de préserver à tout prix la relation et la proximité, quitte à sacrifier ou oublier des éléments plus objectifs liés à la tâche à accomplir. C’est en général un manager très humain et il le revendique. Le manager contre-dépendant lui préfère investir très peu la relation (il y perdrait son indépendance) de sorte qu’il parait plus froid, voire un brin arrogant. On pourrait dire qu’il n’est pas passionné par le lien, persuadé qu’il est qu’on ne peut compter que sur soi-même. Quant au manager interdépendant, il est celui qui est dans une posture d’accueil et de confiance inconditionnelle dans l’autre, dans une juste distance (ni trop loin ni trop proche), mais existe-t-il vraiment ?

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(500) "

Peu de travaux de recherche sur le Leadership s’intéressent au Followership.  Il s’agit pourtant de comprendre ce qui se passe du point de vue du « follower ». Comment aborde-t-il/elle la relation d’autorité ? Comment reconnait-il de l’autorité à son manager ou à toute personne représentant une autorité ? En quoi les croyances sur le leadership impactent la relation manageriale et le style de management ? 

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47444" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(33) "followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(42) "public://followership_leadership_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "14550" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523875136" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0f044934-59df-4d6e-8699-d1f5e757246f" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "63558" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(4) } [63198]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#209 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(72) "Self-Leadership : Où en êtes-vous de vos compétences émotionnelles ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "6784cd76-5cee-445b-a6ba-69497d6b0e0b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1517501809" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "f9b4c152-13bd-4e4b-ab53-563ea1b28090" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6819) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["summary"]=> string(84) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6768) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(83) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47440" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(41) "competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(50) "public://competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "50077" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523874473" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fe59b1f8-8f7b-420d-9583-7c2c1a4df550" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(315) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(360) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6819) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["summary"]=> string(84) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6768) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(83) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(83) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#209 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(72) "Self-Leadership : Où en êtes-vous de vos compétences émotionnelles ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "6784cd76-5cee-445b-a6ba-69497d6b0e0b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1517501809" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "f9b4c152-13bd-4e4b-ab53-563ea1b28090" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6819) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["summary"]=> string(84) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6768) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(83) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47440" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(41) "competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(50) "public://competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "50077" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523874473" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fe59b1f8-8f7b-420d-9583-7c2c1a4df550" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(315) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(360) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47440" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(41) "competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(50) "public://competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "50077" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523874473" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fe59b1f8-8f7b-420d-9583-7c2c1a4df550" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47440" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(41) "competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(50) "public://competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "50077" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523874473" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fe59b1f8-8f7b-420d-9583-7c2c1a4df550" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(127) "Read more about Self-Leadership : Où en êtes-vous de vos compétences émotionnelles ?" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/63198" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(72) "Self-Leadership : Où en êtes-vous de vos compétences émotionnelles ?" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#209 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(72) "Self-Leadership : Où en êtes-vous de vos compétences émotionnelles ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "6784cd76-5cee-445b-a6ba-69497d6b0e0b" ["nid"]=> string(5) "63198" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1517501809" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "f9b4c152-13bd-4e4b-ab53-563ea1b28090" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(6819) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["summary"]=> string(84) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(6768) "

Emotions : le retour

Dans le domaine des formations managériales, on semble (re)découvrir l’importance des émotions. On ne peut que s’en réjouir car l’étymologie « emovere » nous rappelle qu’avec leur art de nous « mettre en mouvement », les émotions servent la gestion, véritable science de l’action. L’émotion est un état psychologique et biologique, positif ou négatif que nous ressentons à un instant T et dans un contexte spécifique (cf. l'article : L’art du questionnement). Elle est universelle et constitue un puissant carburant pour nous permettre de satisfaire nos principaux besoins (de sécurité, de liberté, d’accomplissement, de sens, de subsistance…). Omniprésente dans nos prises de décision, nos relations, notre manière d’être au monde, à notre insu ou au contraire profondément accueillie, elle nous accompagne dans les bons comme dans les mauvais moments. Elle agit comme un GPS en vue de nous adapter à chaque situation.

Pourquoi parler de retour ? 

Dans notre société occidentale, on assiste à un véritable travail de ménage concernant nos croyances sur les émotions. C’est vrai dans le monde de l’éducation et notamment chez les jeunes enfants où l’on voit fleurir dès la maternelle, des invitations à identifier par des moyens appropriés les émotions qui les habitent. Le monde managérial commence lui aussi à faire sa mue. L’autre travail de balayage des formes actuelles d’organisation et de gouvernement des personnes n’y est sans doute pas étranger. Il semblerait que nous soyons en train de sortir d’une vision radicale, presqu’obscurantiste de l'émotion. Evoquer l’émotion pour le management était jusqu’il y a peu encore fortement associée à une approche masculine du management, héritage du fameux « sois fort ! ». Avoir des états d’âme ou des émotions, c’est être faible entend-on encore très souvent dans les formations en leadership de la part des apprenants. Ou encore, c’est contreculturel d’avoir une palette d’émotions dans les entreprises où le manager a l’injonction de montrer un visage respirant l’optimisme, irradiant la seule émotion socialement acceptable : la joie.

Eviter l’evitement 

Or que ce soit du point de vue de la neuropsychologie ou de celui de l’efficience managériale, cette posture de l’évitement de l’émotion est une aberration. En réalité, l’émotion est le signal qu’il se passe quelque chose d’important, d’impactant. Il s’agit donc d’une information de la plus grande importance. Ne pas en tenir compte nous met en danger ainsi que nos équipes (épuisement, maltraitance au travail, insatisfactions/frustrations, conflits, crises…). L’apnée émotionnelle nous éloigne du réel et même nous éloigne du monde vivant. Car l’émotion est au service de la survie, mais aussi de la vie et du « rendre vivant », tout ce dont le manager est responsable dans son périmètre finalement.

Or pour pouvoir intégrer les émotions comme de véritables alliées au service de l’efficacité et de la légitimité du manager, il est indispensable de requestionner la croyance selon laquelle il faut être en totale maîtrise de ce que l’on ressent (la maitrise toujours !). Or nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce que nous ressentons. En revanche nous sommes responsables de ce que nous en faisons. ET c’est de cette confusion entre ressentir et agir que s’insèrent cette peur et ce rejet des émotions. A vouloir s’empêcher de ressentir, l’individu se met dans des stratégies défensives qui l’éloigne de qui il est et de ce qu’il pourrait faire de manière ajustée (de son Self Leadership ( cf. l'article : Self-Leadership, l’art de cultiver ses habilités de direction )).

La connexion, un processus d’autorisation

Il ne s’agit pas de se couper de ses émotions, mais au contraire de les accueillir de plus en plus. Comment ? En s’y connectant. Ici pas de magie, l’émotion n’est pas mentale ; elle passe par le corps, cette partie de nous-mêmes dont nous sommes coupés depuis très longtemps. Le management c’est d’abord et surtout une tête…de moins en moins sûr. Se connecter à ses émotions, c’est réinvestir ce corps et les signaux physiques multiples qu’il nous envoie si nous y sommes attentifs.

Un responsable n’est pas ce robot dont les collègues et collaborateurs ne veulent pas de toutes façons. Le manager connecté à ses émotions autorise tout son éco-système à faire de même, s’ouvrir à toutes ces intuitions pour l’action. L’intelligence qui émane d’un groupe de personnes reliées par leurs émotions est largement plus imposante que la combinaison des seuls cerveaux. C’est donc par cette connexion permanente, en donnant de plus en plus accès à ce ressenti que le manager pourra prendre la responsabilité consciente et maîtrisée de la réponse à donner à la situation. C’est cela que l’on appelle la maîtrise de soi et non le contrôle de l’émotion en elle-même.

Cultiver ses compétences sociales et emotionnelles : un muscle à entrainer de manière reguliere.

En insistant à l’EDHEC sur les formations en Self-Leadership, il s’agit de développer en particulier les cinq compétences suivantes :

Pour travailler ses compétences émotionnelles, la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales propose le parcours Leadership.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(83) "

Les émotions seraient-elles une compétence manageriale à part entière ?

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47440" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(41) "competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(50) "public://competence_emotionnelle_manager_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "50077" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523874473" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "fe59b1f8-8f7b-420d-9583-7c2c1a4df550" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(315) "Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(360) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice et Stéphanie Dhulu, Coordinatrice
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "63198" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(5) } [62853]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(47) "Authentic leadership and the story of your life" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "e5798a44-aa03-4ab4-9b9f-78a70522add9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1515074490" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6e25058b-7622-4998-a61b-8d84edc9bc05" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5015) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(118) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(4984) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(117) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47436" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(25) "leadership_life_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(34) "public://leadership_life_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "49695" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873659" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "93e48eaf-49e6-459f-9ea3-6751efb15c72" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(194) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(206) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5015) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(118) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(4984) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(117) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(117) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(47) "Authentic leadership and the story of your life" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "e5798a44-aa03-4ab4-9b9f-78a70522add9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1515074490" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6e25058b-7622-4998-a61b-8d84edc9bc05" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5015) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(118) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(4984) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(117) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47436" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(25) "leadership_life_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(34) "public://leadership_life_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "49695" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873659" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "93e48eaf-49e6-459f-9ea3-6751efb15c72" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(194) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(206) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47436" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(25) "leadership_life_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(34) "public://leadership_life_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "49695" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873659" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "93e48eaf-49e6-459f-9ea3-6751efb15c72" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47436" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(25) "leadership_life_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(34) "public://leadership_life_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "49695" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873659" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "93e48eaf-49e6-459f-9ea3-6751efb15c72" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(102) "Read more about Authentic leadership and the story of your life" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62853" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(47) "Authentic leadership and the story of your life" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#207 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(47) "Authentic leadership and the story of your life" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "e5798a44-aa03-4ab4-9b9f-78a70522add9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62853" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1515074490" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "6e25058b-7622-4998-a61b-8d84edc9bc05" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525343961" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5015) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["summary"]=> string(118) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(4984) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership. The definition of ‘authentic’ from Merriam Webster is: true to one's own personality, spirit, or character; is sincere and authentic with no pretensions. An authentic leader can be defined as a leader who knows their authentic self, takes action and behaves in a way that is consistent and in-line with their values and principles, empowers others, fosters transparency, is not afraid to challenge the status quo or make unpopular decisions for the greater good, and takes others into consideration.

It sounds like a tall order but the benefits are well worth it. Research shows that although many people can wing-it and get through a challenging situation, it is the authentic leader who, by operating consistently and transparently, drives long-term results. Through good times and bad, their integrity helps sustain organizational results and there is also a legitimacy that comes from being an authentic leader who has high self-awareness and takes actions in line with who they are. They come across as more trustworthy to employees. They also deliver results in a way that creates sustained value for their team. And let’s face it, it takes a lot less energy to just simply be ‘you’ than hiding parts of yourself or splitting your time between your ‘home’ self and your professional self.

So how do we embark on this journey? Through active reflection.  To become an authentic leader, we must develop our self-awareness. In order to become self-aware, examine self, self with others, and one’s experiences.

Through asking the question “How can people become and remain authentic leaders?”a study of 125 leaders aged 23 to 93 found that we do not have to be born with any universal trait to be a leader or in a high level position; regardless of style, authenticity was what made the participants more effective in their leadership, and; becoming an authentic leader emerged from the self-relevant meanings a leader attached to their life experiences. In this study, the authentic leaders reported that difficult life events had been their greatest transformers, leading to deep self-awareness. In the article, Bill George describes these moments as where “You learn what’s important, what you are prepared to sacrifice and what trade-offs you are willing to make.” If we think back to a challenging times in our lives, we may recognize it as a moment where we learned what we were capable of; where we weren’t equipped to handle the situation and needed to develop; we may have been able to identify which changes we wanted to see in the world or ourselves (what was acceptable or no longer acceptable).

The good news is it seems we are all on equal footing here. We are all individuals, with unique values, passions, ideals, and we all come with a one-of-a-kind life story – a long line of defining moments in our lives where we learnt more about who we were or who we wanted to be. We have had moments that influenced us and challenged our assumptions and values; moments that pulled things out of us that we didn’t know we were capable of. Moments where we were able to clearly draw a line of what was acceptable or unacceptable going forward. In each of our life stories, we have all had experiences and interactions – either momentary or long-lasting, good or bad or sometimes both.

And so take a good look at your own life story. Your experiences and relationships, your difficult moments, your triumphs. Take a good look at when you came to know something for certain – about yourself and your values. And then ask – Am I being true to what I know about who I am and what I value? How can I do it more? And it won’t necessary be easy but Bill George (2015) sums it up best in the following:

If you want to be an authentic leader and have a meaningful life, you need to do the difficult inner work to develop yourself, have a strong moral compass based on your beliefs and values, and work on problems that matter to you. When you look back on your life it may not be perfect, but it will be authentically yours.

1.  George, Bill, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer. 2007. “Discovering Your Authentic Leadership.” Harvard Business Review. February 1, 2007. 

2. Shamir, B., & Eilam, G. (2005). What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development. Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417.

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(117) "

Do you know who you really are? Do others? These questions are at the very core of authentic leadership.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47436" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(25) "leadership_life_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(34) "public://leadership_life_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "49695" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873659" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "93e48eaf-49e6-459f-9ea3-6751efb15c72" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(194) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(206) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62853" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(6) } [62654]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#214 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(59) "Le leader, un manager qui a integré ses trois dimensions ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "d3375e6f-6246-4ae1-8945-874e22ebf8ab" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1512062282" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "982bf407-844f-440e-9723-cd8708f80531" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(7183) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(7149) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47432" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(40) "homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(49) "public://homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "116502" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873017" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "3215bb33-29a6-443e-87ab-328bf8a21f04" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(195) "Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(203) "

Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(0) { } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64105" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(7183) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(7149) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(278) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#214 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(59) "Le leader, un manager qui a integré ses trois dimensions ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "d3375e6f-6246-4ae1-8945-874e22ebf8ab" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1512062282" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "982bf407-844f-440e-9723-cd8708f80531" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(7183) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(7149) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47432" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(40) "homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(49) "public://homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "116502" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873017" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "3215bb33-29a6-443e-87ab-328bf8a21f04" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(195) "Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(203) "

Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(0) { } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64105" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47432" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(40) "homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(49) "public://homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "116502" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873017" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "3215bb33-29a6-443e-87ab-328bf8a21f04" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47432" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(40) "homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(49) "public://homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "116502" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873017" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "3215bb33-29a6-443e-87ab-328bf8a21f04" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(114) "Read more about Le leader, un manager qui a integré ses trois dimensions ?" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62654" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(59) "Le leader, un manager qui a integré ses trois dimensions ?" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#214 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(59) "Le leader, un manager qui a integré ses trois dimensions ?" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "d3375e6f-6246-4ae1-8945-874e22ebf8ab" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62654" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1512062282" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "982bf407-844f-440e-9723-cd8708f80531" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525341989" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(7183) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(7149) "

Il existe parfois une confusion à nommer ceux qui encadrent des équipes ou des projets. Sont-ils des managers ou des leaders ? Il peut même arriver à chacun d’être tour à tour l’un et l’autre dans certaines circonstances. Il est donc important pour les « cadres » de positionner le curseur au bon endroit. Les travaux menés au sein de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales suggèrent qu’un leader serait un manager qui a intégré « ses trois dimensions ». 

La littérature managériale s’en donne en effet à cœur joie pour distinguer ce qui relève du leadership transactionnel, propre au manager, du transformationnel qui serait l’apanage du leader. Et cette distinction n’en finit pas de créer le débat sans beaucoup apporter de solution pour aider le responsable à se situer. Regardons les choses autrement et émettons quelques hypothèses en contemplant l’homme de Vitruve (architecte ingénieur romain 1er av.JC) illustré par Léonard de Vinci (peintre inventeur du XVème S.)

Le premier regard donne à voir l’individu dans un carré et le rapporte au monde professionnel. Il décrit un manager qui connait son secteur d’activité, ses objectifs, ses équipes, la culture de l’entreprise dans laquelle il œuvre. Il réfléchit, analyse, organise, distribue, délègue. Ainsi positionné il est stable, fiable, solide. Ses deux pieds sont posés sur sa base (sa terre) et il s’élève, droit, dirigé vers le ciel. Il pense et exerce son esprit. C’est un Homme* debout ainsi qu’un Homme que l’on peut qualifier de « carré ».

Puis l’on remarque l’individu dans un rond. Cette deuxième perspective reconnait le manager en perpétuel mouvement. Il accueille les données, les assimile, les adapte, les déploie. Il connait le passé de sa structure, travaille au présent pour préparer l’avenir. Il sait absorber les imprévus, faire face aux aléas, s’adapter en permanence dans une agilité qui demande vitalité et engagement. Il prend régulièrement du recul, observe les situations, interroge les faits et pratique la remise en question ; le « manager réflexif ». C’est une personne en mouvement, qui « tourne rond ».

Dans ces deux dimensions, au quotidien, dans les multiples, singulières et diverses situations rencontrées, les managers ont à traiter deux axes d’interrogation. Il s’agit pour eux de savoir ce qu’ils doivent faire et ce qu’ils peuvent faire. Ils prennent alors des décisions, réalisent des choix et accomplissent ce qui leur semble juste afin de répondre aux attendus de leur fonction.

Reste dans ce dessin quelque chose qui semble suggéré sans pour autant être mis en perspective : l’espace. Or avec cet homme de Vitruve montre aussi un homme qui contient l’espace qui le contient. Il s’agit alors de considérer cette troisième dimension : la profondeur. Il est intéressant d’observer ce qui constitue la matière première, la « chair » des managers. Pour cela prenons la liberté de nous éloigner du champ lexical de l’entreprisepour se rapprocher de celui de l’humain (?): l’émotion (du latin motio, action de mouvoir, mouvement, trouble, frisson), la sensibilité (du latin sensibilĭtās, faculté de sentir, sens, signification), la créativité et même la transcendance (du  latin transcendere, franchir, surpasser).

Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

On pourrait être tenté d’évincer cette part-là tant elle est méconnue, engageante et dérangeante. Il serait même aisé de déclarer que tout cela est hors sujet. Pourtant, il est essentiel de peser et mettre  en question les compétences, habiletés et dispositions des managers à faire cas de cette réalité-là. Dans la capacité à s’écouter, à ressentir, à décrypter ce qui se joue en soi, à accueillir cette matière première sans jugement ni crainte, à la laisser circuler et animer la personne que l’on est. (le self leadership). Bien sûr il n’est pas aisé pour le manager, en toutes circonstances, de dissocier ce qu’il ressent de ce qu’il fait, de la manière qu’il a de l’accomplir. Sommes-nous prêts à reconnaitre que, malgré lui, ses aspirations profondes, ses valeurs, la vision qu’il a de lui-même, ses intuitions, ses ressentis peuvent « transpirer » et envahir la sphère et sa pratique professionnelle ?

Il serait opportun de retrouver le chemin de l’humilité, celui qui permettrait d’accueillir cette troisième dimension, de l’encoder afin qu’elle réintègre le champ professionnel de façon écologique et d’emprunter une autre voie, celle qui consiste à reconnaitre que les managers sont et demeurent des femmes et des hommes au service d’autres femmes et d’autres hommes. Avec pour objectif que chacun fasse de son mieux pour que l’ensemble atteigne des objectifs de réalisation, de production et même de performance. Ainsi en canalisant, exprimant, privilégiant la sincérité et la franchise, en assumant ce qu’il est, le manager qui s’incarne (tête/corps et cœur) deviendrait un leader.

Il gagnerait une nouvelle dimension, celle de la chair, du charisme, de l’affirmation, il donnerait une couleur, une voix. Il serait un humain dédié à une pratique, à des actions et relations. Il serait en volume, en relief, en perspective. Il ne craindrait ni ses bas ni ses hauts. Il saurait que ses aspérités sont sa marque de fabrique. Il les ajusterait afin qu’elles ne polluent pas ou dénaturent les actions et relations professionnelles dans lesquelles il est impliqué. Il accepterait les impacts, les changements, et même les « révolutions » car il aurait conscience d’être un tout. Il serait alors vertical, horizontal et profond.

Dans ce dernier axe, les managers se trouveraient devant une responsabilité, celle de la signature, du style, de la personnalité qui s’assume dans toutes ses dimensions. Il serait alors capable de contenir son espace intérieur afin d’être lui-même dans l’espace professionnel qui le contient. Il gagnerait sa troisième dimension et l’on peut penser qu’alors il deviendrait un leader. Un leader authentique.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47432" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(40) "homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(49) "public://homme-vitruve-leadership-edhec_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "116502" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523873017" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "3215bb33-29a6-443e-87ab-328bf8a21f04" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(195) "Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(203) "

Claire Baudin
Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(0) { } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64105" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62654" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(7) } [62575]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(28) "Du Leadership à l'Autorité" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "550337cd-1119-4519-b9e7-cd32072d35f9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1510318422" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "c424842f-c08f-40f8-b5f3-fcdd65015a78" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1588) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["summary"]=> string(265) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1615) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(264) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "50238" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "119972" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680084" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "622d6c34-629f-4ecd-9367-9edf9ded16e5" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "RCF Radio" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(17) "

RCF Radio

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(90) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/publications/du-leadership-lautorite-interview-de-sylvie-deffayet" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1588) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["summary"]=> string(265) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1615) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(264) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(264) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(28) "Du Leadership à l'Autorité" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "550337cd-1119-4519-b9e7-cd32072d35f9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1510318422" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "c424842f-c08f-40f8-b5f3-fcdd65015a78" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1588) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["summary"]=> string(265) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1615) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(264) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "50238" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "119972" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680084" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "622d6c34-629f-4ecd-9367-9edf9ded16e5" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "RCF Radio" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(17) "

RCF Radio

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(90) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/publications/du-leadership-lautorite-interview-de-sylvie-deffayet" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "50238" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "119972" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680084" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "622d6c34-629f-4ecd-9367-9edf9ded16e5" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "50238" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "119972" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680084" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "622d6c34-629f-4ecd-9367-9edf9ded16e5" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(88) "Read more about Du Leadership à l'Autorité" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62575" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(28) "Du Leadership à l'Autorité" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#269 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(28) "Du Leadership à l'Autorité" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "550337cd-1119-4519-b9e7-cd32072d35f9" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62575" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1510318422" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "c424842f-c08f-40f8-b5f3-fcdd65015a78" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680731" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1588) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["summary"]=> string(265) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1615) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

"Avec la démultiplication des Nouvelles technologies de l'Information et de la communication, le manager peut être tenté de porter des choses qui ne sont pas chez lui et il se met dans une situation où il souffre davantage. Donc il faut entreprendre les managers avec une autre question[...]: "De quoi je suis responsable moi, en ce moment ?"Et c'est très exigeant cette question  car ce n'est pas "Je suis responsable d'un CA, du bonheur de mes salariés..[...]/ Il est important de répondre à cette question avec un verbe d'action le plus concret possible "Je suis responsable de FAIRE QUOI "[...]"

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(264) "

Sylvie Deffayet, Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences Manageriales à l'EDHEC, invitée de l'émission Témoins d'Entreprise sur RCF Radio partage sa vision du leadership, de l'autorité et des réalités manageriales d'aujourd'hui.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "50238" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(36) "sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["uri"]=> string(45) "public://sylvie-deffayet_format_edhec_vox.png" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/png" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "119972" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525680084" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "622d6c34-629f-4ecd-9367-9edf9ded16e5" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "420" ["height"]=> string(3) "230" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(9) "RCF Radio" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(17) "

RCF Radio

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["fr"]=> array(1) { ["canonical"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(90) "https://www.edhec.edu/fr/publications/du-leadership-lautorite-interview-de-sylvie-deffayet" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62575" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(8) } [62532]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(56) "Self Leadership, l’art du questionnement : Pratiquez !" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "62aec0b4-b845-4242-bdce-a0f2340d2fcc" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509710163" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "db0af272-ceed-4c29-94b5-b316100fccf2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5148) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(5118) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47427" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(44) "questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(53) "public://questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "55409" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869468" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9fc9852b-811b-4eac-a825-c216ee94955d" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5148) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(5118) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(264) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(56) "Self Leadership, l’art du questionnement : Pratiquez !" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "62aec0b4-b845-4242-bdce-a0f2340d2fcc" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509710163" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "db0af272-ceed-4c29-94b5-b316100fccf2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5148) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(5118) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47427" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(44) "questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(53) "public://questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "55409" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869468" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9fc9852b-811b-4eac-a825-c216ee94955d" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47427" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(44) "questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(53) "public://questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "55409" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869468" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9fc9852b-811b-4eac-a825-c216ee94955d" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47427" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(44) "questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(53) "public://questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "55409" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869468" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9fc9852b-811b-4eac-a825-c216ee94955d" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(111) "Read more about Self Leadership, l’art du questionnement : Pratiquez !" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/62532" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(56) "Self Leadership, l’art du questionnement : Pratiquez !" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(6) "French" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#225 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(56) "Self Leadership, l’art du questionnement : Pratiquez !" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "0" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "62aec0b4-b845-4242-bdce-a0f2340d2fcc" ["nid"]=> string(5) "62532" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(2) "fr" ["created"]=> string(10) "1509710163" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "db0af272-ceed-4c29-94b5-b316100fccf2" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525429628" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(5148) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(5118) "

« Quelle est la question sur laquelle j’ai le plus besoin de progresser en ce moment en tant que responsable X, manager, dirigeant… ? »  Pouvez-vous formuler cette question ? Pouvez-vous l’écrire ?

Si oui, regardez maintenant ce que vous avez écrit. Que pensez-vous de cette question ? Vous permet-elle d’agir ? Si tel n’est pas le cas, alors critiquez là pour l’améliorer.  N’est-elle pas trop vague, générale ou encore complexe et un brin confuse ? Probablement avez-vous utilisé un verbe à l’infinitif, des mots abstraits, peut-être introduit un « on ». Pourtant cette formulation est très pertinente à vos yeux mais elle reste très théorique. Et pour y répondre en l’état, il faudrait que vous lisiez une quantité incroyable de manuels et ouvrages traitant du sujet en question. Un bon exercice sur le plan intellectuel mais incompatible avec votre emploi du temps ? Voici une proposition que je pratique depuis 15 ans avec des responsables de tout niveau :

  1. Réécrivez votre question en la commençant par « Comment ». Sinon elle n’ouvre pas sur l’action. L’action, c’est bien ce que vous souhaitez n’est-ce pas ?
  2. Poursuivez avec un « JE » ; Si c’est votre question, alors incarnez là tout comme vous incarnez votre autorité !
  3. Enchainez avec un verbe d’action, le plus concret possible, de sorte que tout le monde comprenne sans équivoque ce dont il s’agit ; Vous terminerez votre thèse de doctorat plus tard. Et surtout, ne vous encombrez pas de « dois-je » « pourrais-je… » « vais-je », qui laisserait sous-entendre que cela pourrait ne pas fonctionner. C’est trop facile ! Allez directement à ce que vous avez à faire et qui vous taraude car c’est justement la question/sujet sur lequel vous avez le PLUS besoin d’avancer en ce moment.
  4. N’oubliez pas la saveur ou la couleur de votre question/sujet : intégrez votre contexte. Si votre question parle très fort à votre voisin, collègue manager, c’est que ce n’est pas encore tout à fait votre question, même si encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question car fréquemment rencontrée quand on exerce des responsabilités. Ce n’est pas la même chose de dire : comment je remotive Caroline ? et Comment je remotive Caroline qui voulait ma place ?
  5. Enfin, terminez par un « pour » ; Que souhaitez-vous faire ?

Réorganiser les choses, remettre de l’ordre, corriger une action, faire cesser une pratique, dire stop ou dire non ? Appuyez-vous sur votre colère, une énergie au service de la transformation. Vous protéger ou protéger les autres, mettre en sécurité un plan, une stratégie, un savoir-faire ? Appuyez-vous sur vos signaux bien légitimes de peur !

Et si une certaine nostalgie ou tristesse pointe dans votre question, c’est que quelque chose est en train de s’en aller, dont vous êtes en train de vous séparer et dont vous n’avez pas encore tout à fait conscience : un rôle, un type de relation, un espoir, un projet, une illusion…etc La bonne nouvelle est que cette émotion que vous acceptez d’écouter vous indique que vous êtes prêt à écrire ou faire écrire une nouvelle page sans vous accrocher fixement à un monde qui n’est plus.Comparez maintenant le premier et le deuxième jet de votre question. Que constatez-vous ? Est-ce plus clair ? suffisamment simple et explicite pour vous comme pour l’autre ? Alors félicitez-vous de la transformation incroyable entre la première et la dernière version de votre question.

Rions au passage de cette capacité que nous avons à nous perdre nous-mêmes avec des formulations pour le moins « fumeuses ».  Pas étonnant que nous ayons du mal à agir et trouver NOTRE réponse lorsque la question est mal posée. Enfin, soyons bienveillant face à notre impuissance à agir parfois.Si vous avez rencontré votre question, alors vous devriez maintenant être reconnecté à toutes vos ressources et vos options pour agir. Vous pouvez en plus, demander quelques conseils supplémentaires à des ressources extérieures que vous choisirez sans peine car votre besoin s’est éclairci et vous êtes capable de faire une demande des plus explicites.

Si vous voulez tester cette discipline, n’hésitez pas à partager en retour vos exemples de voyages entre la première et la dernière version de votre question. Nous nous inspirerons mutuellement !

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "47427" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(44) "questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(53) "public://questionnement_leadership_deffayet_light.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "55409" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1523869468" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "9fc9852b-811b-4eac-a825-c216ee94955d" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "839" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(284) "Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(329) "

Sylvie Deffayet
Directrice de la Chaire Leadership et Compétences managériales, EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(4) "5722" } [1]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "63275" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "62532" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(9) } ["#sorted"]=> bool(true) } ["pager"]=> array(2) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "pager" ["#weight"]=> int(5) } } } } [12]=> array(4) { ["file"]=> string(59) "/var/www/html/edhec-drupal-2.pictime.fr/includes/common.inc" ["line"]=> int(2625) ["function"]=> string(23) "boost_deliver_html_page" ["args"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &array(3) { ["term_heading"]=> array(3) { ["#prefix"]=> string(34) "
" ["#suffix"]=> string(6) "
" ["term"]=> array(8) { ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#bundle"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["#view_mode"]=> string(4) "full" ["#theme"]=> string(13) "taxonomy_term" ["#term"]=> object(stdClass)#262 (15) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" ["vid"]=> string(2) "24" ["name"]=> string(23) "Leadership & Management" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "0b0b0086-950a-40ac-9729-e69afeb3b2ab" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["i18n_tsid"]=> string(1) "0" ["vocabulary_machine_name"]=> string(9) "vox_sujet" ["field_media_sujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "49799" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "banner_self-leadership.gif" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://banner_self-leadership.gif" ["filemime"]=> string(9) "image/gif" ["filesize"]=> string(6) "523671" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1525426192" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "306fcb91-509a-441b-bd0c-a6c75a6c1687" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } ["alt"]=> NULL ["title"]=> NULL ["width"]=> string(4) "1950" ["height"]=> string(3) "650" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { ["title"]=> array(1) { ["value"]=> string(54) "EDHECVox [term:name] | [current-page:pager][site:name]" } } } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(5) { ["rdftype"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:Concept" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(10) "rdfs:label" [1]=> string(14) "skos:prefLabel" } } ["description"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "skos:definition" } } ["vid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "skos:inScheme" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["parent"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(12) "skos:broader" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "0" } ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#attached"]=> array(1) { ["css"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.css" } } } } ["nodes"]=> array(11) { [64359]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(297) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(95) "Read more about Another change? How to let go of the old" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64359" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#253 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(40) "Another change? How to let go of the old" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "1" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "9f40f324-288d-4dbe-abd9-e2a25496d4d7" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64359" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1528103255" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "dc5f5c40-4c79-4bc7-a3b9-09cd755ed667" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528193217" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(8365) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["summary"]=> string(0) "" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(8315) "

When was the last time you experienced a change in your professional life, at a personal level such as a change in company, team or position? Or maybe it was at an organizational level such as restructuring, rebranding, new processes in place of the old?

We don’t need to look far for evidence that change is happening. From academia, the press, or testimonies from clients who come to the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair for Leadership development. It’s like rapid fire nowadays and from a psychological perspective, or performance perspective if you like, navigating change can be tough, for new and experienced managers alike.

Given the words of Gautama Buddha “Remember that the only constant in life is change” and our own experiences of the reliability and inevitability of change, we can be proactive and add a few tools in our belt to better navigate the changes that are less easy.

Because here is the thing about change. It can be tricky. It doesn’t mind compounding itself (when it rains it pours). Rarely does one change wait kindly on the sidelines while we finish dealing with another change first. It doesn’t wait until we have regained our footing to kindly ask if we are ready to deal with the next one. Change rarely considers our readiness, our energy reserve, or other issues we are already facing etc.

This isn’t to say that change can’t be easy. Take a brief moment to celebrate a change you navigated well… You have it in mind? Good. There are times when change goes relatively smoothly – for example, when you choose to implement a new procedure for your department to replace one that just wasn’t working. There may be hiccups as the new software is implemented, while you and your team are getting hang of the new process but due to the general enthusiasm of getting a new way of doing things and the buy-in from all members, the change will happen more quickly than if nobody wanted the change or didn’t believe that it would solve any problems.

But this article focuses on changes that don’t go so well. Think of a time when you were faced with a change that you did not expect, did not want, did not believe in (possibly all three) or brought some unforeseen surprises. This is where we can fall into turbulent waters, making the transition painful, slow, and uncomfortable.

Let’s take a look at the William Bridge’s Model of Transition – a model that makes sense of our personal journey when faced with a change. To be clear in the terminology, according to Bridges: A change is an external event. It happens out in the world. How change affects us is the Transition. A transition is the psychological ‘getting used to’ this change that each individual must go through.

Here’s an example from a Regional Manager who moved up to National Manager within a French B2B company. Bill saw this promotion as recognition for his hard work, high sales results for his region and excellent relationships with his teams. The new position would allow for an increase in responsibility, relocation to the sunny south of France for his family along with a more lucrative salary and bonuses. So far so good. This change was a source of pride, excitement and possibility.

But after a few months in the new position, Bill felt stuck and frustrated. Bill counted on (and received) all the good things that would come from the new position and level of responsibility – he got used to these with minimal effort. What he didn’t foresee was what he would lose when moving into this new position. One of the best parts of his previous post had been working on the ground, side by side with the teams in his region. His relationships and his presence had been very strong, creating a high functioning family feel. As a now National Manager, Bill felt powerless when hearing his old team was struggling under their new regional manager. And in addition, they still kept turning to him for support and guidance. The team was not letting go and neither was Bill. After all, they had had a great thing going and losing it was just not comfortable. But it also meant that Bill wasn’t fully present in his new position and his old team were not fully connecting with their new manager.

Part of self-Leadership is being able to step back and identifying when and where you are stuck. If you find yourself asking questions such as ‘why am I resisting this? Why am I having negative thoughts around this change, process, new person? What am I afraid of losing?, why do I no longer love what I used to find satisfying? – Then it’s the perfect time to try out the following steps.

Here are five steps to letting go of the old, allowing you to move forward:

  1. Identify what you are losing and gaining. Things like status, relationships, routine, expertise, ways of working…  Also, acknowledge that feeling that you are losing something is often subjective. It doesn’t matter if it’s big or seemingly insignificant to others. Loss is loss. And when we acknowledge and feel the emotions around it, only then can we move on. Bill had great gains with his promotion but he also really felt the loss of his close work relationships that he hadn’t anticipated.
  2. Identify the emotions you are experiencing. Feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, resentment, fear, excitement, are all normal feelings when faced with losing something whether that ‘something’ is expected or unexpected, large or small, desired or undesired.
  3. Identify exactly what is changing and what is not changing – Breaking it down into elements can make a big change more manageable. During a Merger for example, the products may stay the same (I get to keep my expertise) while teams may gain new members (New relationships during a time when anxieties and fears may be high especially if there are layoffs). Now we can focus on dealing with the relationship aspect without compounding it with fear of losing our feeling of competence.
  4. Information is key. Asking for as much information or doing your own research can help you quickly check off a few concerns on your list and let you focus on the more important and impactful ones.
  5. Let go, Get closure, say goodbye. Once you identify what you are losing, take a moment to honour that loss. Reflect what it brought to you and why you will miss it. Then take a moment to celebrate what you had. Ceremonies – whether informal or formal – are great ways to honour and let go. It can also help to identify the things that were not working well (an honest and balanced appraisal of the past).
  6. Finally, give the new (job, boss, process, brand, level or responsibility, relationship) a fresh view. Just like with seeing the old with an honest and balanced perspective, it is equally important to find something (anything) positive in the new thing. Nurture the positive and see where it can go.

These steps can help you get unstuck, let go of the old and move forward. When managing many changes or even just one big one, we need to be patient and kind to ourselves. Just think, if change is constant… it also means we have all successfully navigated many changes in life already. Managing ourselves in transition is a skill in itself and we can get better at it. One this is certain – we will have plenty of opportunities to practice.

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(0) "" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(7) "2925103" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(26) "self-leadership_change.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(35) "public://self-leadership_change.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "54965" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1528108074" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "b4da5352-21f1-400b-9d33-4d9186a84bb0" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(192) "Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(204) "

Nicolle Browne-Jamet
Leadership & Managerial Competencies Chair , EDHEC Business School

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "341" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "64108" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(0) { } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#language"]=> string(2) "en" ["#contextual_links"]=> array(1) { ["node"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(4) "node" [1]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(5) "64359" } } } ["#weight"]=> int(0) } [64067]=> array(13) { ["body"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "1" ["#title"]=> string(4) "Body" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(4) "body" ["#field_type"]=> string(17) "text_with_summary" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(498) "Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(510) "

Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "19964" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(13) "The Economist" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(21) "

The Economist

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(23) "text_summary_or_trimmed" [0]=> array(1) { ["#markup"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } ["field_image"]=> array(16) { ["#theme"]=> string(5) "field" ["#weight"]=> string(1) "0" ["#title"]=> string(5) "Image" ["#access"]=> bool(true) ["#label_display"]=> string(6) "hidden" ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#language"]=> string(3) "und" ["#field_name"]=> string(11) "field_image" ["#field_type"]=> string(5) "image" ["#field_translatable"]=> string(1) "0" ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["#object"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" } } } ["field_tags"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(2) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "195" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "186" } } } ["field_media"]=> array(0) { } ["field_cible"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(3) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "163" } [1]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "162" } [2]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(2) "20" } } } ["field_image"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } } ["field_author"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(498) "Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(510) "

Julia Milner, Academic Director of the Global MBA, Researcher at the EDHEC Leadership and Managerial Competencies Chair, EDHEC Business School. Julia Milner has just been appointed among the world’s top 40 Business School professors under the age of 40 by Poets & Quants

" } } } ["field_section"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "263" } } } ["field_voxtype"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "343" } } } ["field_videovox"]=> array(0) { } ["field_voxsujet"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["tid"]=> string(3) "333" } } } ["field_personne"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(1) { ["target_id"]=> string(5) "19964" } } } ["field_media2"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(3) { ["value"]=> string(13) "The Economist" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(21) "

The Economist

" } } } ["metatags"]=> array(0) { } ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(11) { ["field_image"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(8) "og:image" [1]=> string(12) "rdfs:seeAlso" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["field_tags"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(10) "dc:subject" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["rdftype"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(9) "sioc:Item" [1]=> string(13) "foaf:Document" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(8) "dc:title" } } ["created"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(7) "dc:date" [1]=> string(10) "dc:created" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["changed"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(11) "dc:modified" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } ["body"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(15) "content:encoded" } } ["uid"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:has_creator" } ["type"]=> string(3) "rel" } ["name"]=> array(1) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(9) "foaf:name" } } ["comment_count"]=> array(2) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(16) "sioc:num_replies" } ["datatype"]=> string(11) "xsd:integer" } ["last_activity"]=> array(3) { ["predicates"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "sioc:last_activity_date" } ["datatype"]=> string(12) "xsd:dateTime" ["callback"]=> string(12) "date_iso8601" } } ["path"]=> array(1) { ["pathauto"]=> string(1) "1" } ["name"]=> string(24) "amandine.badel@edhec.edu" ["picture"]=> string(1) "0" ["data"]=> string(171) "a:5:{s:16:"ckeditor_default";s:1:"t";s:20:"ckeditor_show_toggle";s:1:"t";s:14:"ckeditor_width";s:4:"100%";s:13:"ckeditor_lang";s:2:"en";s:18:"ckeditor_auto_lang";s:1:"t";}" ["print_html_display"]=> int(1) ["print_html_display_comment"]=> int(0) ["print_html_display_urllist"]=> int(1) ["entity_view_prepared"]=> bool(true) } ["#items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } } ["#formatter"]=> string(5) "image" [0]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(15) "image_formatter" ["#item"]=> array(16) { ["fid"]=> string(5) "48848" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["filename"]=> string(16) "coach_leader.jpg" ["uri"]=> string(25) "public://coach_leader.jpg" ["filemime"]=> string(10) "image/jpeg" ["filesize"]=> string(5) "92053" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["timestamp"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["type"]=> string(5) "image" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "027bca57-5473-4e7e-9ddd-6329209d0568" ["rdf_mapping"]=> array(0) { } ["image_dimensions"]=> array(2) { ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["alt"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["width"]=> string(3) "840" ["height"]=> string(3) "460" } ["#image_style"]=> string(0) "" ["#path"]=> string(0) "" } } ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(30) "_field_extra_fields_pre_render" } ["#entity_type"]=> string(4) "node" ["#bundle"]=> string(7) "article" ["links"]=> array(4) { ["#theme"]=> string(11) "links__node" ["#pre_render"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(23) "drupal_pre_render_links" } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } ["node"]=> array(3) { ["#theme"]=> string(17) "links__node__node" ["#links"]=> array(1) { ["node-readmore"]=> array(4) { ["title"]=> string(85) "Read more about Coaching to improve motivation" ["href"]=> string(10) "node/64067" ["html"]=> bool(true) ["attributes"]=> array(2) { ["rel"]=> string(3) "tag" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" } } } ["#attributes"]=> array(1) { ["class"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(5) "links" [1]=> string(6) "inline" } } } } ["language"]=> array(3) { ["#type"]=> string(4) "item" ["#title"]=> string(8) "Language" ["#markup"]=> string(9) "Undefined" } ["#view_mode"]=> string(6) "teaser" ["#theme"]=> string(4) "node" ["#node"]=> object(stdClass)#257 (41) { ["vid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["uid"]=> string(3) "331" ["title"]=> string(30) "Coaching to improve motivation" ["log"]=> string(0) "" ["status"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment"]=> string(1) "0" ["promote"]=> string(1) "0" ["sticky"]=> string(1) "1" ["vuuid"]=> string(36) "5ea2556b-32e1-4aab-84c0-fd3cee694af4" ["nid"]=> string(5) "64067" ["type"]=> string(7) "article" ["language"]=> string(3) "und" ["created"]=> string(10) "1524835281" ["changed"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["tnid"]=> string(1) "0" ["translate"]=> string(1) "0" ["uuid"]=> string(36) "309b0a51-95b2-471c-9f39-df9c606f6c35" ["revision_timestamp"]=> string(10) "1527085023" ["revision_uid"]=> string(3) "330" ["body"]=> array(1) { ["und"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["value"]=> string(1499) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["summary"]=> string(156) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

" ["format"]=> string(9) "full_html" ["safe_value"]=> string(1483) "

Julia Milner, Professor of Leadership and Academic Director of the Global MBA at EDHEC Business School, has been just appointed among the world's top 40 business school professors under age of 40 by Poets & Quants.  In a recent article posted on The Economist website, she explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills.

 

Read the article

 

 

" ["safe_summary"]=> string(155) "

In a recent article posted on The Economist website, Julia Milner explains the importance of "shaping" leaders with coaching skills